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Jacquelyn Sparks

History 325

Dr. Murphy

5/4/01

 

 

Table 1: Top 10 and Bottom 10 Average Salaries in 41 Selected Occupations in Manufacturing

Industries (based on national averages in 1870)

 

Type of Manufacturing Occupation

Average Yearly Salary in Dollars

# of Women in the Industry

Woman as a Percentage of all Workers in the Occupation

Top 10

1. Varnish

 

 

607.37

 

 

2

 

 

.4%

2. Millstones

605.40

0

0 %

3. Bellows

575.72

0

0 %

4. Type-founding

541.02

413

31.02 %

5. Bridge-Building

537.48

0

0 %

6. Furniture- Refrigerators

528.88

0

0%

7. Stereotyping & Electrotyping

502.93

15

1.9 %

8. Hardware

480.86

1179

8.2 %

9. Furniture—Not Specified

441.42

657

1.6 %

10. Group Building (Excluding Marine)

440.89

58

Less than 1%

Bottom 10

32. Collars and Cuffs— Paper

33. Brick

34. Brooms and Whisks

35. Boots and Shoes

36. Baskets

37. Clothing—Women’s

38. Boxes, Cheese

39. Millinery

40. Straw Goods

41. Beehives

 

 

 

278.58

248.62

243.73

230.8

224.43

214.94

180.13

160.57

142.25

96.12

 

 

 

1,448

258

982

19,113

73

10,247

11

6,106

12,594

0

 

 

 

 

 

70.1%

.5 %

18.5 %

14.1 %

7.9 %

87.6 %

1.5 %

84.4 %

84. 38 %

0 %

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: This was made from the 1870 census data regarding selected manufacturing industries. The purpose of the table is to point to the disparity between the wages earned by the majority of women compared to those of men in selected occupations. While the yearly averages may be, in fact, more representative of the wages that men would receive, it is still clear to see where women were on the scale of wage earning in these occupations. In the top 10 paying occupations, women were completely excluded from four of these. Conversely, they constituted 70 percent or more of four of the lowest paying occupations.

This table illustrates the imbalance between the wages earned by men and women at the time, and gives an indication of manufacturing occupations that women were more likely to engage in. One interesting anomaly in the data is the amount of women in the type-founding industry—over 30 percent. This occupation was fourth on a scale of wages, and it seems that the amount of women involved in this occupation was relatively high compared to the other top ten. Further investigation would be needed to determine why there was such a high involvement of women in this industry. Perhaps the average salary--$541 per year—is deceiving, and an examination of men’s real wages in typesetting verses women’s wages in typesetting is needed.